Chinese Cruise Ship in Bad Weather

Aside from the U.S. government data breach by the suspected Chinese, the capsized cruise ship, Oriental Star, in the Yangzi River has also been in the news.  From the two articles below, you can read from the victims’ families telling their stories and doing their best to find answers from the government about their relatives.  The government is not being as accommodating and quick to relatives as they have historically been, but I suspect everyone on this rescue effort is doing their best, though I would hope they are not hiding negligence to protect key people.  There are 14 survivors so far, unfortunately, the dead rises to 396 out of 450 on board.

The first article is from the NY Times – which gives great detailed news and two convenient boxes, “What We Know” and “What We Don’t Know”.  I think these two boxes are great to get quick updates if you’re on the run, plus, the “What We Don’t Know” gives readers another level of honesty and reputability in their reporting.  The other is from SF Gate – this one is new to me but I find it trustworthy so far.  It’s shorter and more recent than the NY Times article.  Both have images to see and have different info.

Updates follow.

In Spotlight, Chinese Officials Are Reluctant to Embrace Transparency After Yangtze Disaster

With hundreds missing in a ship's capsizing on the Yangtze River, families and local residents, above, are still getting little information on the disaster from China's government. Credit Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
With hundreds missing in a ship’s capsizing on the Yangtze River, families and local residents, above, are still getting little information on the disaster from China’s government. Credit Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

Death toll in Yangtze River capsizing hits nearly 400

Medical workers prepare to get into the capsized Eastern Star ship, rear left, after being lifted by cranes on the Yangtze River in Jianli county of southern China’s Hubei province, as seen from across the river from Huarong county of southern China’s Hunan province, Saturday, June 6, 2015. Disaster teams are searching the now-upright ship bobbing on the water for more bodies, making it China's deadliest boat disaster in nearly seven decades. Photo: Andy Wong, AP / AP
Medical workers prepare to get into the capsized Eastern Star ship, rear left, after being lifted by cranes on the Yangtze River in Jianli county of southern China’s Hubei province, as seen from across the river from Huarong county of southern China’s Hunan province, Saturday, June 6, 2015. Disaster teams are searching the now-upright ship bobbing on the water for more bodies, making it China’s deadliest boat disaster in nearly seven decades.

June 8 Update

From CNN.  Videos and pictures included from the source.

China cruise ship disaster: 434 bodies recovered; 8 still missing

Rescuers search for survivors from the capsized ship in the Yangtze River in Jingzhou on June 2.
Rescuers search for survivors from the capsized ship in the Yangtze River in Jingzhou on June 2.
A survivor is carried onto the riverbank after being rescued on June 2.
A survivor is carried onto the riverbank after being rescued on June 2.

 

 

 

 

 

June 14 Update

From Reuters.  Pictures at the source.

China puts ship disaster survivors at 12, says all 442 bodies found

June 15 Update

From NY Times.  Read the details about the passengers’ luggage.

China Ends Recovery Efforts on Ship That Capsized on Yangtze

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Leanne

I began writing Elle's Adventure in China (EACh) in June 2014 as a fun summer project, but as obstacles kept interfering with my plans, I forked and forked more options. I took writing this novel much more seriously in mid-July, and want to have it officially published someday in my lifetime. As many artists put their hearts into their projects, so do I. I did not start out liking to read, but a professor suggested a book for me for homework a few years ago, and it was an amazing book. Since then, I read for pleasure, and I hope my novel, Elle's Adventure in China, does the same for as many of you as possible. The same thing goes to writing. I did not like to write until I took a course where the professor and papers made me love to write. I hope every one of you find what makes you happy and dedicated to work. In May 2015, I started my other blog, Read and Write Here (R&WH), as a place to post other things that aren't China- and Chinese culture-related and not EACh. I share some of my memories and experiences from student teaching, irregular participation in Daily Prompts, etc. I'd like to have regular people and bloggers to write book reviews and post it on R&WH someday. Keep reading and writing!

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