Personalizing ROY G. BIV

In conjunction with Blogging 101 to make a prompt personal, I responded to The Daily Post’s Daily Prompt’s Photo Challenge: ROY G. BIV.  All of my readers and visitors know that I lack visuals (but each page/post loads quickly!) all over.  So I reinterpreted the prompt to educate people about colors in Chinese culture.  Yeah!

Good Colors

Red is most definitely the best color because it symbolizes luck, prosperity, and everything good, hence the red envelopes for the New Year and weddings.  Traditionally, wedding clothes were red for both bride and groom.  You cannot go wrong with red.  In the West, however, red is a negative color (think back to the days when your teacher corrected tests with a red felt pen) and associated with danger/caution (stop sign and stopping at a red traffic light, and blood).  It is also associated with power and confidence.  In addition, it is connected with a sexy/seductive color, which, if you are wearing red wedding clothes, a seductive game is already in the works.  See, the Chinese knew what they were doing picking red as the best color.

Another color you cannot go wrong with is yellow/gold.  It symbolizes royalty (check out Curse of the Golden Flower with Jay Chou playing cameo), and more obviously, gold, money, and wealth.  On the other hand, the West/Europe see purple as the color of royalty, and green with money and wealth.

Green is more agreed upon by Chinese and Western cultures, for it symbolizes eco-friendly things.  Chinese also perceive green as high-tech stuff.

Bad Colors

Black and white are negative colors because they are funeral colors = associated with death.  Chinese people take deaths and funerals very seriously, so if you plan on impressing someone (or someone’s parents), this is a NO-NO! If you are giving a gift with white or black wrapping, you are telling them you want them to die, or what I like to think, “what’s inside is your death.”  If the thought of wearing black and white at a funeral for a Chinese person crossed your mind, you are right.

Due to Western influences, Chinese brides are wearing white wedding gowns, which I think is super wrong, because it goes against Chinese culture.  If they are Chrisitan or believe in some other faith where wearing all white is ok, then I think there is a gray area so it is ok.  Same thing applies to the groom wearing a jet black suit with a crisp white dress shirt.  To my knowledge, originally, Western brides wear white wedding gowns to symbolize their virginity, which there is a great deficiency in the present.

All Other Colors

All other colors are ok, since they are more or less neutral.  Color is definitely better than black and white.

Next time you think of giving to impress, consider the colors you carry.

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Published by

Leanne

I began writing Elle's Adventure in China (EACh) in June 2014 as a fun summer project, but as obstacles kept interfering with my plans, I forked and forked more options. I took writing this novel much more seriously in mid-July, and want to have it officially published someday in my lifetime. As many artists put their hearts into their projects, so do I. I did not start out liking to read, but a professor suggested a book for me for homework a few years ago, and it was an amazing book. Since then, I read for pleasure, and I hope my novel, Elle's Adventure in China, does the same for as many of you as possible. The same thing goes to writing. I did not like to write until I took a course where the professor and papers made me love to write. I hope every one of you find what makes you happy and dedicated to work. In May 2015, I started my other blog, Read and Write Here (R&WH), as a place to post other things that aren't China- and Chinese culture-related and not EACh. I share some of my memories and experiences from student teaching, irregular participation in Daily Prompts, etc. I'd like to have regular people and bloggers to write book reviews and post it on R&WH someday. Keep reading and writing!

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