Lunar New Year 2017

Greetings everyone.  After being exhausted from furious cleaning earlier this week, I spent time with my family and sleeping.  I’m online now and wish everyone a happy and prosperous new year! 

The Lunar New Year is the largest national holiday in China and among Chinese.  Workers get time off as well as lucky money in red envelopes from their employers.  It’s also celebrated until the 15th of the month.

Here are 7 traditions for Chinese New Year:

  1. The new year is celebrated with fire crackers to scare demons away (demons mean bad luck)
  2. You don’t clean anything to not wash your luck away
  3. You wear new clothes, mostly red and pink.  Red is a good color, symbolizing luck, prosperity, and celebration.  Stay away from black and white because they’re associated with death and funerals, symbolizing misfortune
  4. Generally, you get a red envelope (with money) if you’re not an adult.  Rules and traditions vary among people groups and families to when the money stops coming
  5. You don’t gamble and spend money to ensure that you’d have money in your pocket for the whole year
  6. Although you’re not supposed to gamble, gambling is widespread among Chinese, so this no-gambling tradition isn’t really followed
  7. Gamblers gamble today to test their luck.  If they win, they’ll end with a surplus and thus a good year; if they lose, they’ll end with a deficit and thus a bad year

Here are select pictures from the Associated Press on MSN of celebrations from handful of countries that celebrate the Lunar New Year.  Visit the source for many more images in an article.

Performers turn a wheel spinning molten iron to create sparks at the Great Wall Iron Sparks show in Yanqing county on the outskirts of Beijing, China on Jan. 28.  Ng Han Guan/AP Images
Performers turn a wheel spinning molten iron to create sparks at the Great Wall Iron Sparks show in Yanqing county on the outskirts of Beijing, China on Jan. 28. Ng Han Guan/AP Images
Members of the Chinese community perform on stage during the celebrations of the Chinese Lunar New Year on January 28, 2017 in Rome. This Lunar New Year marks the start of the Year of the Rooster.  Andreas Solaro/AFP/Getty Images
Members of the Chinese community perform on stage during the celebrations on Jan. 28 in Rome, Italy. Andreas Solaro/AFP/Getty Images
Lunar New Year in Hong Kong, China - 28 Jan 2017 Participants perform a lion dance during the International Chinese New Year Night Parade in Hong Kong, China, 28 January 2017. Chinese around the world celebrate the Lunar New Year on 28 January 2017.  FAVRE/EPA/Shutterstock/Rex Images
Participants perform a lion dance in Hong Kong on Jan. 28. FAVRE/EPA/Shutterstock/Rex Images
NORTH SUMATRA, INDONESIA - JANUARY 28: Residents celebrate Chinese New Year on January 28, 2017 in North Sumatra, Indonesia.The Chinese Lunar New Year also known as the Spring Festival, which is based on the Lunisolar Chinese calendar, is celebrated. Barcroft Media/Getty Images
Residents celebrate Chinese New Year on Jan. 28, in North Sumatra, Indonesia. Barcroft Media/Getty Images
Buddhist monk in festival attire participate in the rally to mark Sonam Losar or Lunar New Year in Kathmandu, Nepal, January 28, 2017. (Photo by Sunil Pradhan/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
Buddhist monks in festival attire participate in a rally in Kathmandu, Nepal on Jan. 28. NurPhoto/Getty Images
A fire breather blows flames as a troupe performs a traditional dragon dance during the first day of Chinese Lunar New Year in Yangon's Chinatown district on January 28, 2017. This Lunar New Year marks the start of the Year of the Rooster.  / AFP / YE A
A fire breather blows flames as a troupe performs a traditional dragon dance in Yangon’s Chinatown district in Myanmar on Jan. 28. Ye Aung Thu/AFP/Getty Images
A Chinese lion dance troupe performs in front of a shop at Chinatown to celebrate the start of the Lunar New Year in Yokohama on January 28, 2017. / AFP / TOSHIFUMI KITAMURA        (Photo credit should read TOSHIFUMI KITAMURA/AFP/Getty Images)
A Chinese lion dance troupe performs in front of a shop at Chinatown in Yokohama, Japan on Jan. 28. Toshifumi Kitamura/AFP/Getty Images
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Published by

Leanne

I began writing Elle's Adventure in China (EACh) in June 2014 as a fun summer project, but as obstacles kept interfering with my plans, I forked and forked more options. I took writing this novel much more seriously in mid-July, and want to have it officially published someday in my lifetime. As many artists put their hearts into their projects, so do I. I did not start out liking to read, but a professor suggested a book for me for homework a few years ago, and it was an amazing book. Since then, I read for pleasure, and I hope my novel, Elle's Adventure in China, does the same for as many of you as possible. The same thing goes to writing. I did not like to write until I took a course where the professor and papers made me love to write. I hope every one of you find what makes you happy and dedicated to work. In May 2015, I started my other blog, Read and Write Here (R&WH), as a place to post other things that aren't China- and Chinese culture-related and not EACh. I share some of my memories and experiences from student teaching, irregular participation in Daily Prompts, etc. I'd like to have regular people and bloggers to write book reviews and post it on R&WH someday. Keep reading and writing!

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